First Look at Evan Peters as Cannibal Killer in Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story

Netflix has released the first look at Evan Peters as sadistic serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer in the upcoming limited series DAHMER, also titled Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story.

The teaser for the 10-episode Ryan Murphy-lead project is little more than a slow zoom into Peters’ eye, covered by a monstrous bloodshot contact lens, but Dahmer’s evil is palpable nonetheless.

Watch the bone-chilling teaser below:

Alongside longtime Murphy collaborator Peters, Richard Jenkins (The Shape of Water) and Penelope Ann Miller will star as Jeffrey’s parents Lionel and Joyce Dahmer; the cast also includes Niecy Nash as Dahmer’s concerned neighbor and Shaun Brown as Dahmer’s last and only victim to escape and alert the authorities.

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Three known directors signed on for DAHMER, including Carl Franklin (House of Cards), Paris Barclay (NYPD Blue) and Janet Mock (Pose, Hollywood). The directors will also executive produce alongside Murphy and Ian Brennan, who has previously worked with Murphy on projects such as Glee, Ratched, and Scream Queens.

DAHMER to Take More Psychological Approach Than Previous Depictions

Jeffrey Dahmer, also dubbed the “Milwaukee Monster” during his reign of terror, murdered and dismembered 17 men and boys from 1978 to 1991—with many of those victims being people of color and/or underage.

While the infamous serial killer has had his story told for the screen several times, DAHMER is expected to take a more psychological approach rather than a gory one. Although the dramatized series will span from the 1960s to the 1990s, through Dahmer’s grisly crimes that often included necrophilia and cannabilism, the main focus is how these murders were allowed to happen over several years.

Read the full tagline for the series, which does not have a release date yet, below:

“Monster chronicles the story of one of America’s most notorious serial killers, largely told from the point of view of Jeffrey Dahmer’s victims, and dives deeply into the police incompetence and apathy that allowed the Wisconsin native to go on a multi-year killing spree. The series dramatizes at least 10 instances where Dahmer was almost apprehended but ultimately let go. The series also is expected to touch on white privilege, as Dahmer, a clean-cut, good-looking white guy, was repeatedly given a free pass by cops as well as by judges who were lenient when he had been charged with petty crimes.”